Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Dutch dreams lie at the heart of Delaware's Advocacy dissidence


The Guardian pens a masterpiece, with this brilliant follow-up to our original post Why bicycle mode share is (and will remain) less than 1%. Excerpts:

"Squint at Stevenage’s extensive 1960s protected cycleway network and you could be in the Netherlands – except for the lack of people on bikes. So why did the New Town’s residents choose the motor car over the bicycle?

The town, 30 miles north of London, had wide, smooth cycleways next to its main roads which were separated from cars and pedestrians. There were well-lit, airy underpasses beneath roundabouts, and schools, workplaces and shops were all linked by protected cycleways.

Eric Claxton, the lead designer of post-war Stevenage, had believed that use of cycleways would be high if they were well built – originally thinking that Britain’s hostile road environment discouraged people from cycling.

Stevenage was compact, and Claxton assumed the provision of 12 ft-wide cycleways and 7 ft-wide pavements would encourage residents to walk and cycle. He had witnessed the high usage of Dutch cycleways, and he believed the same could be achieved in the UK.

But to Claxton’s puzzlement and eventual horror, residents of Stevenage chose to drive – even for journeys of two miles or less. Stevenage’s 1949 masterplan projected that 40% of the town’s residents would cycle each day, and just 16% would drive. The opposite happened.

Stevenage’s 2010 master plan complained that just 2.9% of the Stevenage population cycled to work, which was “much lower than might be expected given the level of infrastructure provision”.

The borough council’s cycle strategy – not updated since 2002 – conveys no doubt as to why cycle usage is so low: “Stevenage has a fast, high-capacity road system, which makes it easy to make journeys by car."

There are safe cycle routes from homes to schools, but today only a tiny proportion of Stevenage’s children cycle each day. Many are ferried to school by car, a situation that Claxton abhorred.

Despite all the best efforts of a chief designer with empathy for would-be cyclists, “build it and they will come” failed for people on bikes in Stevenage but worked for people in cars."

As long as driving remains cheap and easy, bicycling as a significant mode share will forever stay in the realm of fantasy. And even then, pump prices are exponentially higher in England than the U.S., where this lovely pathway network has been all but abandoned. Our case has been, and always will be that Advocates whose sole focus is on costly separated facilities -- as opposed to pragmatism -- are driving the divide that prevents a united bicycling advocacy front in Delaware. Read the full article.

Check out the Facebook page "Pragmatic Bicycle Drivers", where pragmatism in bicycling advocacy lives.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Without New Castle County, forget Walkable, Bikeable Delaware


The State of Delaware has made great strides when it comes to funding some key, albeit isolated trails and pathways projects. And DelDOT is doing a wonderful job incorporating safety enhancements (crosswalks, bike lane/shared lane treatments, signage, etc) with reconstruction and pave & rehab projects.

Unfortunately, there are few such multi-modal considerations in New Castle County's Unified Development Code (UDC). And with a State level advocacy organization that won't place any emphasis on retrofitting the built environment, expect little in the way of reduced auto dependency. It's an easy conclusion to draw, not only based on the Code itself, but in dealing with the evidence time and time again when attempting to walk or bike.

Probably the most glaring UDC deficiency is found in the retrofitting or reconstruction of existing structures. Essentially, a building and its property is only bound by rules set forth on the day of its first recorded plan; more recent requirements can be disqualified, unless the project expands the building by least 1,000 square feet.

Examples of items added to the UDC over the years include the ADA (American Disabilities Act, 1990) and bicycle accommodations in the form of a parking rack and an entrance bike lane (1997). The fact that so many (if not most) projects are the reconstruction of older buildings seems to explain why these requirements are commonly waived.

In SECTION 40.08.130 we see the following:

Applicability:
The redevelopment of a site pursuant to Subsection B.6 permits the continuation of certain nonconforming situations, but prohibits the creation of any new nonconformity or the expansion of an existing nonconformity.

Design Element Improvements:
Improvements toward further code compliance shall be made to design elements such as, but not limited to, parking, buffers, landscaping, access, setbacks, storm water management, impervious cover, off-site transportation improvements/capacity, or mitigation of damage to or enhanced protection for existing natural/environmental resources.

The exploratory sketch plan shall identify and quantify all of the existing non-conformities on a property. The property owner must propose improvements in selected design elements listed [below], such that in totaling the individual design element improvements, the aggregate shall be equal to or greater than a four hundred (400) percent improvement.


So what we have in New Castle County is multi-modal (including handicapped) access and improvements put squarely in the hands of the business and/or property owner. They can omit these in favor of dozens of other choices, as long as it meets this "400% improvement" matrix, however that's determined. And the problem isn't just limited to reconstruction; missing code requirements are sometimes found on brand new buildings. Regardless, it is extremely difficult - if not impossible - to enforce the UDC after a Certificate of Occupancy has been issued. Obviously, the better odds would come with missing ADA facilities, given the far greater profile of handicap access, as opposed to bike/ped access in general.

This new Dunkin Donuts in Glasgow is the retrofit of an older building, and thus exempt from critical multi-modal requirements. Among them is no bicycle parking, and high curbs (instead of ramps with truncated domes) to connect an adjacent bike path facility that parallels Route 896.
Another serious fault with NCC is their use of gates or hanging chains or cables across roads, driveways and trails to block cars. This often forces foot or bicycle traffic (legal in most cases) to circumvent over curbs or via ditches or culverts. They should be using bollards.
The required bike lane was waived for the newly reconstructed Shop Rite in Glasgow, despite other improvements that were called for en-route to the magic "400%" required in the UDC. These included new curbing, islands and crosswalk at the main entrance from 4-Seasons Parkway.

With regard to bicycle parking, a helpful NCC Dept of Land Use representative had this to offer:

"New bicycle parking usually accompanies new or expanded car parking, since existing parking areas were built from older plans. There has been some resistance to providing bicycle parking, perhaps based on an idea that it won’t be used. And sometimes existing bicycle parking goes unused, with bicycles instead locked to posts and trees."

"Enhancements of County Code may be possible, to more thoughtfully provide bicycle parking with subdivision and land development plans. For example, the current flat requirement for bicycle parking might be replaced with requirements for specific land uses such as non-automotive commercial, offices, and apartments. The Code might also suggest preferred types of bicycle parking, and require fastening them down so they don’t disappear."


It is a foregone conclusion that if folks are dissing bicycle parking in favor of trees or posts, then the rack is either unsafe to use, hidden from view, or inconveniently located. In any case, if the same thinking was applied to handicapped car parking spots -- that in many cases appear underutilized or never used -- they too would be poorly placed, reduced in size and potentially damaging to vehicles.

In conclusion, the need for multi-modal improvements at the county level is a very underrated and all but forgotten area of bicycling advocacy. If we are to have any chance at all of reducing auto dependency, we need code reforms that encourage alternate transportation modes at all levels of building and property development.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Money, political comatose ends the STOP campaign

Another article in the Wilmington News Journal today confirms that the STOP (Save The Orphanage Property) campaign has officially ended in defeat. While most would expect it was the outcome of a price bidding war between government and developer interests, that was anything but the case. Multiple examples of dishonesty, and/or a gross lack of political will are to blame, and will go down as having ended the Ogletown-S. Newark's last hope for a regional park --- forever.

Instead, they have ensured us thousands more car trips per day on an already failed LOS (level of service) Route 4 corridor, and all kinds of havoc on multiple quality of life issues that have been thoroughly documented on this website. These include loss in real estate values, destruction of endangered wildlife habitat, paving over vast swaths of already flood-prone land, etc.

The following was gleaned directly from the WNJ article. It more than substantiates STOP's claim of dishonesty and political comatose, by those who we elected to represent our best interests. We italicized comments that are either suspect or conflicting:

  • [Mark Schafale, Felician Sisters of North America] expects his organization on Friday to finalize an agreement to sell 172 acres to a housing developer. That agreement ends a two-year push for government to derail the development by purchasing the land for a park.
  • "It is hard to put blame on one, two or three people," said Angela Connolly, one of the founding members of the Save the Orphanage Property Facebook group. "There are so many players in this nasty tragedy comedy."
  • "It isn't fair to say the sisters are trying to profit from this," Schafale said.
  • "I just don't think the county ever understood or chose to look at it from our perspective," Schafale said.
  • Meyer’s first publicly disclosed offer for the property came in July. The offer was rejected, prompting state Sens. Bryan Townsend and Ed Osienski, both D-Newark, to criticize Meyer for offering too little and suggesting the executive didn’t really want to get a deal done.
  • Meyer has criticized Townsend, saying the state legislator had said he could secure the entire $6 million purchase through the state. Ultimately, the Legislature committed $1.25 million in a bill that also made it easier for the Sisters to build the apartments without the entire development. Schafale said that was a boost to the park effort.
  • Townsend said that money was approved with the understanding he'd be seeking more to cover the state's half of the cost. He denies that he ever represented the state would pay the entire purchase price.
  • On Thursday, Townsend said the land being sold is "deeply disappointing" and the county had not acted with the urgency necessary to close a deal.
  • "Oddly, it was like pulling teeth to try to get the urgency from them on behalf of the public," Townsend said.
  • Meyer brushed off that criticism saying he had made four offers for the property without receiving a single written counter.
  • "If you make four written offers to buy a property ... and you never receive a single counteroffer in writing, who is being insincere?" Meyer said.
  • Schafale said Meyer's first two offers were "non-starters" because there was no acceptable path to executing the apartment development without the houses. He added his organization was in regular communication with the county about what was necessary for them to reach a deal.
  • "Our representatives laid out in very precise terms what we needed, and there was significant movement on that in August but it wasn't everything and wasn't enough," Schafale said.

We have nothing else to say at this point, except that with this level of government dysfunction, we cannot be called a "democracy". No wonder so few citizens attend civic meetings and legislator coffees -- why bother when you don't have a voice? Shame on all of our elected that we are going to lose this magnificent (and only remaining) parkland opportunity for the Ogletown-S. Newark region. 

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

NTSB Report: The 85th Percentile rule is killing us

Advocates have been asking DelDOT for years to lower the speed limit on Route 4 in Ogletown, from 50 mph to 40, or at least 45 for a start. Despite several traffic studies showing speeds as high as 57 mph even in front of area schools including the Delaware School for the Deaf, they insist that the rule is well justified.

From Streetsblog -- Traffic deaths in the U.S. are mounting, reaching more than 40,000 last year, and, according to a recent draft report by the National Transportation Safety Board, speed is the overlooked factor.

The NTSB reported that speeding accounts for about 10,000 deaths a year -- as many as drunk driving. One of the agency’s key recommendation was to change the way streets are designed by reforming the “85th percentile rule,” a laissez faire approach that seeks to accommodate motorist behavior instead of engineering streets for safety.

It’s an argument that Randy LoBasso at the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia has been making for a long time. Now that the NTSB report is vindicating advocates’ critique of the 85th percentile rule, he writes:

"The 85th Percentile idea, based on the 1964 “Solomon Curve” says speed limits should be set at what 85 percent of drivers think is healthy. It was created back when the highway system was still young, cars didn’t approach speeds as quickly as they do today, and we didn’t have the sort of statistics and research on traffic dangers we do today. [More . . . ]

Despite numerous residential, school, and retail zones that are rich with bike-ped activity, the speed limit on Route 4 in Ogletown/S. Newark remains posted at 50 mph. The 85th Percentile basically assumes that 85% of people are good drivers, and with that, sets it to their average speed. It's complete nonsense, because far less than 85% are truly good drivers. But more significantly, it fails to consider the safety of pedestrians, bicyclists, and other vulnerable road users.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Newark's Main Street Rehabilitation Workshop set for 8/15 at 7pm

Project Overview:
The scope of work for this project includes the replacement of the existing bituminous concrete pavement, pcc curb, sidewalk, drainage improvements, signal upgrades, curb extensions, pavement markings and signage.
Visit the workshop page HERE for location and further details.

What a disappointment that advocates aren't pushing for this. We discussed the possibility with DelDOT's Mark Luszcz, Chief P.E. in Dec. 2016, and found that it basically requires the City getting on board with it, at least with a proposal.

An attractive and livable downtown for Newark will stay an impossible dream until traffic is sharply reduced (one lane, with serious bike lanes and sidewalks) or eliminated from Main Street. The congestion, noise, fumes, etc is oppressive, to say the least. This project won't change that. The City needs to reconfigure its traffic pattern to allow Main Street -- or at least a good stretch of it (i.e. Tyre to Academy) -- to close to motor traffic. It could become one of a growing number of Pedestrian Malls in the U.S.

Since everyone knows that this level of change -- one that would actually reduce motor vehicles on Main Street -- is too progressive for Newark, everything else must be considered. Treatments like a green sharrow lane will at least help bicycle (and indirectly, pedestrian) safety, and wonderfully compliment other traffic calming measures.

Most of the cars in downtown Newark are University of Delaware students that live nearby (within easy walking/biking distance) and out of town cruisers checking out the "scenery". What a waste. So many other cities are transforming their Main Streets now (Charlottesville VA, Cumberland MD to name a few) in favor of non-motorized traffic. Sad that Newark can't take lessons from them.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Matthew Meyer, Felician Sisters Quash STOP Campaign

Clearing the property will start in the coming days or weeks
Save The Orphanage Property (STOP) officially ends campaign in defeat. Region's pedestrians, joggers, bicyclists, youngsters, etc come up empty. Glasgow, Pike Creek will remain nearest recreational park.

As of August 8, continued talks between New Castle County Executive Matthew Meyer and the Felician Sisters of North America broke down for the last time after failing to negotiate a few minor contractual terms. With a vote from the Sister's board of directors, a developer is now lined up to buy the land at barely over the appraised value ($5.9M) that was originally offered by Mr Meyer. They they will now go forward with the apartments, high density townhomes in the field space, and upscale houses replacing a large portion of woods and wetlands. Since the project plans are now fully completed, construction could begin at any moment.

As we look back on this tragic loss and gross injustice, a win for the disenfranchised residents of Ogletown-S. Newark just wasn’t in the cards. STOP advocates left no stone unturned, looking for any opportunity that would save this beautiful land and bring them a regional park. It was an exemplary citizen advocacy campaign that stuck to the facts, maintained decorum, and promoted full respect for our elected officials and the Nuns. Their core group included Donald Sharpe, who along with Dorothy Miller, helped save the White Clay Creek State Park. Also included was a NCC Tax Ditch Manager, an experienced environmental scientist and grant writer (who tirelessly sought other public and private funding sources), and a few other hard working citizen advocates who lived in the area. More than enough government funds were identified, including $1.25M in the State's Bond Bill, and even more in NCC's Parks budget. Significant private donor funds, totaling $1M or more, were also identified, with more under discussion. Further, the Felician Sisters offered to allow payments over 5+ years. You just couldn't have found a better offer, which amounted to a half price bargain for NCC. Ten organizations and multitudes of residents supported the STOP campaign, including almost a thousand following on multi-media alone. STOP yard signs dotted the neighborhoods.

Save The Orphanage Property's last act as an organization will be a final press release, with the facts as we know them. We will try to explain what has happened, why it happened, and who the few are (or the one) that allowed this to happen. One thing we do know for certain; after a long two years of advocacy and many sleepless nights, STOP ended in a total collapse of government representation of its citizens. It is something that the people will never, ever forgive their elected officials (and much of the Catholic Church) for. The Chestnut Hill "Preserve" will forever serve as a daily reminder of government incompetence, indifference, lack of empathy, and profiteering en-mass. Like a huge monument it will forever stay, always there to remind us that ordinary and working class folks mean little or nothing to them. We are no longer part of a democracy that represents the majority, but rather, a tiny minority of wealthy elite.

Saturday, July 29, 2017

Orphanage Property on the brink

This is our latest understanding about the fate of the Orphanage Property.

The Felician Sisters of North America entered into a contract in mid-April to sell the bulk of the Orphanage Property (beyond their affordable housing project) to a new, local developer. They included a provision allowing them to “opt out” of that contract if the county was able to present a fair and workable offer. After two months, and no further response (beyond an offer of appraised value only) from Executive Meyer and New Castle County, that option was allowed to expire in June. The onus is now on the new developer (unknown at this time) to buy the property, which still carries some flexibility to exit the contract if they so choose. A 16 day extension was recently granted, giving the developer additional time to decide whether or not to move forward with the purchase, which would then become irrevocable. That extension will, apparently, run out one day next week.

According to sources in the know, there is a very slight chance on the buyer’s (new developer) side that may allow the “window of opportunity" to re-open. Indeed, the buyer could still back out. As of right now, both buyer and seller have agreed on 90+% of terms. If the final 10% falls through, the County/State would have a chance to step up -- but it would only be successful if Executive Meyer and NCC are serious and ready to put up a fair offer. This would include funds to cover at least half of the project (Chestnut Hill "Preserve) planning costs up to this time.

In the words of Mark Schafale, the Felician Sister's Chief Financial Officer:

I am sorry we were unable to work out an alternative arrangement with the county prior to that expiration. We certainly did everything we could to cooperate with discussions in that direction, but it just did not get done. The sisters believe strongly that God is watching over this process, and that if the park is meant to be, something will emerge to make that happen. But for now, we are awaiting our buyer’s final decision as to whether to move forward with the purchase (which will eventually lead to the building of the other 200 housing units). That is where things stand and we will try to keep you informed as things continue to unfold.

Again, these are the "facts" as we know them. They are derived from multiple sources, including our elected leaders and the Felician Sisters themselves, and are all we have to go on. Barring a miracle, we have forever lost this invaluable opportunity on Executive Meyer's refusal to offer above the appraised value of $5.9M, and the Sister's (and Mr Meyer's) refusal to put the desperate pleas and needs of thousands of real people before maximum financial gain. It's a very sad day for New Castle County, looking at the kind of environment that we (and those claiming the highest of righteousness) are planning to leave for those that come after us.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Remembering Eloy Sandoval-Mateoz

By Angela Connolly -- Three years ago, on July 26, 2014, at approximately 8:30PM, 21-year-old Rahul A. Patel was driving a 2003 Honda Accord at a high rate of speed on westbound Del. 273 (Ogletown Road) and was approaching Ruthar Drive when he lost control of his car. The car traveled off the roadway onto the center median, rotated counter-clockwise and continued into the intersection, where the passenger side hit Eloy Sandoval-Mateoz, 44, of Newark, who was northbound through the intersection on a bicycle and was trying to cross Del. 273. Mr. Sandoval-Mateoz sustained multiple traumatic injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene. Mr. Patel was later convicted of driving at a high speed, while under the influence of drugs/alcohol. A handful of bicycling Advocates attended the sentencing for Mr Patel in November, 2015, where we witnessed the Honorable Judge Medinilla order that he be imprisoned be for 18 months without possibility of parole for killing the cyclist. Although additional conditions were set at the time of sentencing, we did not feel that the punishment was fair, as it was revealed at time of sentencing that Mr Patel had prior convictions for speeding and aggressive driving. Sadly, presumably because impoverished family members in Mexico could not attend the proceedings, none of Mr Sandoval-Mateoz's loved ones were there, and so the Judge never had to look into the eyes of the people that he left behind, to see the anguish there. And although we members of the bicycling community were there and would have welcomed the chance to speak for Mr. Sandoval-Mateoz, we were not allowed to. So Her Honor never heard how the loss of this fellow cyclist had affected us, the cycling community, his fellow riders. Mr Sean Lugg, Prosecutor, did a wonderful job representing Mr Sandoval-Mateoz, and during his testimony, he described a much-loved, gentle family man, who was here working hard, and sending his earnings back home to his family in Mexico. A family that now lives not only without their beloved family member, but also with the financial devastation caused by the loss of the earnings that were sent to them.

Eloy Sandoval-Mateoz had the sad distinction of being Delaware's first bicycle fatality of the year 2014. He was born on December 2, 1969. He was 44 years old at the time of his death. There were no funeral services for him here, and his body was sent home to his family in Mexico. Before he was killed, he was what some call an Invisible Cyclist, one of many who dot our landscape, traveling along the busy corridors that take them to their jobs, on their errands, and everywhere they need to go, because they do not use cars. He was from Mexico, and may have been undocumented. I wondered about where he was traveling to, or from, on that terrible night. Because of the hour of the crash, I thought that he was perhaps on his way home, possibly from a job in Newark. Maybe he was weary, and just wanted to get home, to rest. Maybe he was on his way to a night shift, or to meet some friends. We will never know. His body lay at the Coroner's Office for several days before he was even identified, because those closest  to him feared to claim him, as they too were probably undocumented. This set off a sad chain of events, where Eloy's name would soon fade from the news stories. We later learned that he was a husband, a Father, and a Grandfather. Although I did not know Eloy personally, from the description of him, I believe that I had passed him in my travels on my bicycle, on that same road and nearby my home in Ogletown. We would wave at each other. He appeared to use his bike for his primary means of transportation. After this tragedy, I never saw him again.

I am glad that there is a beautiful Ghost Bike at the spot where he tragically died, and I think of him each and every time I pass the site. Some bicycling Advocate friends and I had planned to put up one for him, but someone beat us to it, someone anonymous, and for that I am very grateful. It is beautifully done, in the tradition of the Ghost Bike, and shows that others know that he too was a human being, with family, friends, and a wider community that cared about him. I hope that the motorists who pass it know what it means, and that they think about how their actions behind the wheel can injure and kill others. I hope that every cyclist that passes it, no matter how they dress, or what they ride, will feel empowered, and know that there is a wider community that cares for them, and watches out for them. Because Eloy Sandoval-Mateoz wasn't ever invisible - some just chose not to see him.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Confirmed: Alternative 3 for Elkton Road Reconstruction Project

In light of recent comments and 1st State Bikes advocacy, DelDOT has confirmed that the Elkton Road reconstruction/expansion project will be scaled back by nearly 2/3 to reflect actual needs. This number is derived from a reduction in added lanes between Otts Chapel Road and Route 4/896 (Christina Parkway).

Courtesy of Heather Dunigan, Wilmapco
The revision guarantees that only one additional lane will be added on the NE-bound side, to serve as an extended right turn-only lane. The SW-bound direction will maintain two through lanes similar to the existing design as we see it.

Latest excerpts from the Project Manager:
We have indeed moved forward with this change and are currently only proposing a 3rd through lane in the eastbound direction of Elkton Road from Otts Chapel to SR 4.

We are hoping to begin right-of-way acquisitions this Fall with the goal being to go to construction in the Spring of 2019.  Thanks for your interest in the project!


A huge tip of the helmet goes to Mark Tudor of DelDOT, for responding quickly and bringing our comments and concerns before the Project Team. Also Bryan Behrens, Project Manager, for his excellence in transparency and genuine consideration of public comments. Surely, other DelDOT folks contributed as well; a hat tip goes to everyone involved.

Runners and bicyclists are commonplace on Elkton Road between Newark and Maryland.

The view from the handlebars, thanks to Alex Soroka. Interim bike lanes were installed on Elkton Road prior to the latest Pave & Rehab (resurfacing).

Saturday, July 15, 2017

NCC Executive Meyer puts the brakes on STOP

Statement from the Save The Orphanage Property (STOP) Campaign:

We are very sorry to have to tell you that we have lost this epic battle. We have all but exhausted every avenue of approach in trying to bring Ogletown a regional park instead of a destructive and totally unnecessary high density housing development. What we have found is that, no matter how or what we try, it is virtually impossible to win the battle for responsible land use in NCC when government and land developers are thoroughly allied and entrenched. Our campaign to protect the landscape, that included the identification of funding (State and donor), is over after 2 long and exhaustive years. It is a great shame because the property owners and their attorney had indicated their desire to negotiate, and make a deal for parkland instead. This is a tragedy that should not have happened.

In this particular fight, we had a thoroughly proven and documented case for why a regional park would be the superior choice and of greatest benefit to the already underserved residents of Ogletown and S. Newark. There was a few million dollars in NCC park funds available in the budget thanks to former Executive Tom Gordon. Our Legislators put 1.25M in the Bond Bill. A conservancy org had pledged 3/4 million. The Open Space Council pledged a quarter million more. In an offer of generosity, the Felician Sisters had agreed to accept a multi-year buy-out plan from the county/state, meaning that future payments could simply be earmarked in future budgets. This was a one time only opportunity that will never come again. It was a dream offer for NCC, and when something means this much, they make it happen. Not this time, not for Ogletown. Now the dream is dead. With his refusal to budge one dollar above the 5.9 million offer that he made to the Felician Sisters, County Executive Matthew Meyer has condemned this community to the devastating consequences of this massive development project which we now know will take place. Sources told us that although Mr. Meyer did indeed make an offer, it was one that was unreasonable, and designed to fail. Matthew Meyer has decided the future of generations to come. History will remember this, and his legacy will not be one of honor. Remember this when you enter the voting booth upon his re-election.

Where there's a will, there's a way. Instead, County Executive Meyer has turned his back on us. He and NCC lack political will and have put builders and profits over their constituents, quality of life, and the planet. At the County Council Meeting that we attended on July 11, instead of communication, respect, and transparency, we witnessed episodes of hostility and resentment, along with accusations of shady dealing and underhandedness. And from the start of Executive Meyer's term, there were red flags. Ask yourselves how Joseph Setting, the very Developer who just won the Orphanage Property, landed a position as Chairman of Executive Meyer's Parks Transition Team. This was a clear conflict of interest and we may yet investigate how we can make a formal objection.

We at STOP chose to take the high ground during the last few weeks, choosing to trust that Mr. Meyer would do the right thing, and act in the best interests of this community. We refused to participate in demonstrations and protests because we felt that, if there was even a shred of hope left, we could not risk alienating the Felician Sisters by risking disrespect shown to them during a protest. We also were bound to the many organizations that honored us by supporting us, and wanted to conduct ourselves with dignity. We choose to do battle with the keyboard, which we feel is mightier than the sword.

One thing we have learned is the importance of community engagement. Although we are at this moment devastated by Executive Meyer's sabotage, our spirits are not crushed. Although we will soon disable this page, we hope that you will join us here, or at 1stStBikes.org, where we will continue to try a make a difference and connect with our community. Land Use advocacy has left a bitter taste in our mouths, but our concern for our community will continue.

In closing, we urge all of you to consider what has unfolded when entering the voting booth next time. Please, never forget. Please consider this fiasco when voting for candidates for County Council. There is nothing more we can say at this point, except thanks to all of you for your support. We want you to know that we did everything within our power to stop this development from happening. We regret that we did not succeed.


Friday, July 7, 2017

DO: Ogletown park proposal gets state funding commitment

By Lex Wilson, Delaware On-Line -- State money has boosted an effort to create a park on a former orphanage property in Ogletown, an effort to fend off a proposed 269-home development.

Tucked inside legislation that funds state construction projects is a commitment for the state to pay $1.25 million toward the purchase of a portion of the former Our Lady Of Grace Home for Children property.

"It is a huge step forward," said State Sen. Bryan Townsend, D-Newark, who sits on the committee responsible for crafting the state's legislation for construction. "The key question at the county level is, are they similarly able to formalize a financial commitment to making this park possibility a reality."

The state's current commitment will only cover a portion of the $5.9 million appraised value of the property. New Castle County Executive Matt Meyer said his government is evaluating how much money it can put toward the proposal.

"The state's work done. It is now fully on the county to act," said Angela Connolly, co-founder of a residents' group bent on preserving the property. [Full story ...]

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Bike Delaware Quashes Pedestrian Safety Bill

While the push continues to pass the "Bicycle Friendly Delaware Act" (HB-185) that includes legalizing rolling stops for bicyclists, a campaign that began 2.5 years ago to reform Delaware's vehicle code for pedestrian safety has stalled. Known as the "Pedestrian Bill", it is modeled after other progressive States such as WA, MA, OR, etc, bringing it up to date with our built environment. As it stands now, Delaware's language is almost totally car-centric, placing the onus squarely on pedestrians not to get killed. It actually requires a person to be in a crosswalk before a yield is legally required, whereas other States require simple intent to cross as the trigger. In other words, you could stand at the curb waiting for all eternity, because motorists are legally permitted to continue (at speed) through crosswalks unless you physically place your body out there, in harms way.

There are other issues with Delaware's current pedestrian code as well, including an ancient reference to Father's Day that somehow influences the law's enforcement. The whole thing is antiquated, as the State's death and injury rate -- consistently among the highest per-capita in the U.S. -- continues unabated. Meanwhile, the legal system targets pedestrians, holding motorists blameless in virtually every case. Routine patterns such as smart phone use, speeding, and aggressive driving are never cited, though most drivers engage in it. Updating the language would be a monumental step in the right direction, helping to provide a sensible basis for education and enforcement and to give pedestrians the confidence they need to use proper facilities where available.

Where does bicycling fit in? Bicycles are largely unaccounted for and misunderstood on pathway facilities of any kind. For example, if a crash occurs while riding on a parallel (with the road) multi-user pathway (MUP), especially where it enters a crosswalk, there is nothing in the code and no clear legal standards that apply. It will fall on the judge to determine fault, and the odds are overwhelming that he/she will favor the motorist regardless.

Unfortunately, Bike Delaware, the states “advocacy” organization for cyclists and pedestrians, does not support and in fact has opposed efforts to update the pedestrian code. Considering this organization’s lack of support, we need others to step up. At the same time, we should ask why Bike Delaware fails to address the serious changes that are needed for bicycle and pedestrian safety on the very pathways that make up their signature cause. Maybe it's because it is an organization accountable to no one, not even its own donors that include the White Clay Bicycle Club. It claims to fully represent Delaware’s bicycling and pedestrian communities but has no interest in teamwork or consensus, and produces no newsletter or annual report.

The above said, let's all hope that Governor Carney signs HB-185. And let’s hope that all of us can get behind efforts to address the critical issues outlined above.

A brand new 10' wide multi-user pathway (MUP) was recently installed along Rt.4 in Ogletown, just east of Harmony Road. If a crash was to occur in the crosswalk between a bicyclist and a car, the odds are overwhelming that the bicyclist will be cited and the driver held blameless. If you're a pedestrian, you must be in the crosswalk to be legally protected, and bicyclists are not even mentioned. Unfortunately, with a radius right turn, most drivers will be caught off guard by anyone just happening to be there, given the induced high speed.
-- Amy Wilburn, former Chair of the Delaware Bicycle Council, contributed to this article.